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The top 10 most scarce occupations on the European labour market

There is still enough talent in Europe, if you know where to find them

 ICT Managers, Managing Directors, CEO’s and Software Developers are the scarcest professions in Europe. In almost every European country it is very difficult to recruit them. Almost everywhere, because ICT Managers in Greece and Sweden have a normal feasibility to recruit. The least scarce occupations in Europe are Journalists, Linguists, Primary school teachers and Cultural professionals. This is the result of analyses and algorithms by Intelligence Group, based on the European Recruitment Dashboard and the Eurostat data.

Top 10 most scarce occupations in Europe

In the following table the top-10 most scarce professional groups in Europe is stated, based on the average scarcity in 27 European countries. The scarcity score varies from 1 (not scarce at all) till 10 (extreme scarce). With an average score of 8,5 in 27 countries, the ICT managers are the most scarce in Europe. In Hungary and Lithuania with a scarcity score of 9,8, while in Greece this is 5,7, reflecting a normal recruitment feasibility followed by Sweden (6,0). In every difficult to recruit profession, there are sweetspots of talent in Europe where that talent is easier to find. For example, the battle for electrical equipment installers and repairers to help Western Europe in the energy transition is much more easily won in Latvia, Portugal and Poland, than for example in Germany or the Netherlands.

Occupational professions (ISCO-3)

Qualification by Intelligence Group

Average European Scarcity

1. Information and communications technology service managers

very difficult to recruit

8,5

2. Managing directors and chief executives

very difficult to recruit

8,2

3. Software and applications developers and analysts

very difficult to recruit

8,2

4. Database and network professionals

difficult to recruit

7,9

5. Manufacturing, mining, construction, and distribution managers

difficult to recruit

7,6

6. Electronics and telecommunications installers and repairers

difficult to recruit

7,7

7. Engineering professionals (excluding electrotechnology)

difficult to recruit

7,3

8. Electrical equipment installers and repairers

difficult to recruit

7,2

9. Mathematicians, actuaries and statisticians

difficult to recruit

7,2

10. Electrotechnology engineers

difficult to recruit

7,2

The top-10 least scarce European occupations

Where we see scarcity for teachers in other parts of Europe, like in Great Britain, Denmark and some parts of the Netherlands, we also see that in Europe this occupation is one of the least scarce professions. In difference to IT or engineering professions, these less scarce occupations are less easy to exchange among European countries. Besides language and cultures, also in certification there are a lot of mismatches. That makes it impossible to have a complete free market for the European Labour force.

Occupational professions (ISCO-3)

Qualification by Intelligence Group

Average European Scarcity

1. Artistic, cultural and culinary associate professionals

should not be difficult to recruit

2,3

2. Primary school and early childhood teachers

should not be difficult to recruit

3,3

3. Authors, journalists and linguists

should not be difficult to recruit

3,4

4. Secretaries (general)

should not be difficult to recruit

3,8

5. University and higher education teachers

should not be difficult to recruit

3,8

6. General office clerks

should not be difficult to recruit

3,9

7. Secondary education teachers

should not be difficult to recruit

3,9

8. Administrative and specialized secretaries

fairly difficult to recruit

4,1

9. Shop salespersons

fairly difficult to recruit

4,3

10. Medical and pharmaceutical technicians

fairly difficult to recruit

4,4

Scarcity especially large in middle/east Europe. The south of Europe has enough talent available

In the following ranking you see the 27 European countries (of which is data available) based on the average labour market scarcity and recruitment feasibility. Especially in the Middle/East of Europe, followed by west/Nordics is scarcity. In the south of Europe are the most available labour market resources. “With a 2,9% unemployment rate within the Netherlands, the 11th place in this ranking seems remarkable. But the score is not only based on employment, but also the recruitment feasibility. In the Dutch labour market talent is easier to recruit in comparison to for example Germany or Hungary. Besides that, within small countries like Netherlands and Belgium, there are already enormous local differences, for example in Belgium between Wallonia, Brussels and Flanders.” Stated by Geert-Jan Waasdorp, CEO of Intelligence Group. “Transparency on the European Labour market give employers and employees a better view where to find each other with all the benefits for the European Economy.”

Top-27 European ranking on Labour Market Scarcity in 2019

  1. Germany
  2. Czech Republic
  3. Hungary
  4. Great Britain
  5. Lithuania
  6. Austria
  7. Finland
  8. Norway
  9. Slovenia
  10. Sweden
  11. Netherlands
  12. Romania
  13. Poland
  14. Switzerland
  15. Slovakia
  16. Estonia
  17. Belgium
  18. Ireland
  19. Latvia
  20. France
  21. Portugal
  22. Bulgaria
  23. Spain
  24. Croatia
  25. Greece
  26. Denmark
  27. Italy

Software developers are available in Europe

In every country, you can find scarce skills that are needed all around Europe, for example you can find easily painters in Italy. In Croatia you can find Machinery mechanics and repairers and in Greece Engineers. Even for the most scarce profiles, there is talent available in Europe. In the European map you can see where there are software developers left (Source: European Recruitment Dashboard). This is in the more red countries like Croatia, Sweden, Finland and Ireland. You could also look on a different way to the numbers and look where the willingness to work in another country is bigger. In that case Spain and Greece score higher. But not every European country is even popular to go to. This depends on the country of origin and the destination country.

 

More information

More information or extra background for journalistic purposes, please contact:

T: info@intelligence-group.nl

E: +31 88 730 2800

 

Research background

The calculations of labour market scarcity for different occupational groups in Europe is based on two main sources: the Global Talent Acquisition Monitor and Eurostat data.

For each occupational group in each country we analyze to what extent this group shows different outcomes on the aspects below compared to the overall national outcome:

  • Sourcing pressure: how often is the target group being approached by recruiters or employers with a job offer. The higher the sourcing pressure, the higher the scarcity.
  • Labour market activity: the share of the target group that is actively looking for a (an other) job. The lower the labour market activity, the higher the scarcity.
  • Three statement about the labour market:
    • ‘People with the same job as me find another job easily’ à the higher the share that agrees, the smaller the scarcity
    • ‘There are a lot of vacancies for people with the same job as me’ à the larger the share that agrees, the higher the scarcity
    • ‘I know a lot of people who had the same job as me being unemployed at this moment’ à the smaller the share that agrees, the higher the scarcity
  • Size of the target group (number of employees in the same occupational group). The smaller the size of the target group, the higher the scarcity.

Using this data we calculate the relative scarcity or in other words, the differences between occupational groups within the same country. Depending on the scale and direction of the differences, occupational groups get a relative score ranging from -5 to +5.

Next, we also take in to account the absolute degree of labour market scarcity for each country in total. For this part we make use of the following indicators that describe the current economic and labour market situation/status:

  • GDP growth
  • Unemployment rate
  • Economic Sentiment Indicator (ESI)
  • Industrial confidence indicator
  • Consumer confidence indicator
  • Job Vacancy Rate
  • Factors limiting the production – Labour

For all of these indicators (source Eurostat) we examine whether the score is below or above the long-term national average (i.e. the last 14 years). The more indicators have a score above their long-term national average, the higher the overall labour market scarcity in a certain country. The default score is +5. The score is adjusted to 4 at minimum or 6 at maximum.

Finally, for each occupational group their individual score (between -5 and +5) is added by the national score (between 4 and 6), with the condition that the final score has a minimum of 0 and a maximum of 10.

Looking for greater insight into labour-market data?

Interested in smarter international recruitment using the European Recruitment Dashboard? This dashboard gives you access to data from 28 countries in Europe, concerning 500 professional groups. It will empower you to develop and fine-tune your recruitment strategy in the European labour market. The data we use comes from our very own European job-market study: The Global Talent Acquisition Monitor (GTAM) and from Jobfeed by Textkernel. If you are interested in more information about this dashboard, please contact us to request a demo. 

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